#Snippets

August 02, 2020

#Read Kubernetes API data using Golang

Get the API client.

import (
  "fmt"
  "context"
  "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes"
  "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
  metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
)

// use the current context in kubeconfig
config, err := clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags("", "<path_to_KUBECONFIG>")
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}

// create the clientset
clientset, err := kubernetes.NewForConfig(config)
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}

Usage examples:

  • read servers data
nodeList, err := clientset.CoreV1().Nodes().List(context.TODO(), metav1.ListOptions{})
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}
  • read pods data
namespace := "example"  // leave empty to get data from all namespaces
podList, err := clientset.CoreV1().Pods(namespace).List(context.TODO(), metav1.ListOptions{})
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}

ListOptions struct can take two important strings, field selectors and label selectors. This can be used

options := metav1.ListOptions{
  LabelSelector: "labelName=labelKey",
  FieldSelector: "spec.nodeName=<node_name>",  // Example for filtering by node name
}

Field selectors and label selectors on this case operate in the same way that the CLI options for kubectl do. So, the same rules apply here.

Further reading

Official docs on Field Selectors and Labels.

Section break
August 02, 2020

#Read Kubernetes metrics-server data using Golang

First, get the metrics API client.

import (
  "fmt"
  "context"
  "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes"
  "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
  metricsv "k8s.io/metrics/pkg/client/clientset/versioned"
)

// Get the config
config, err := clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags("", "<path_to_KUBECONFIG>")
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}

// Get the metrics client
metricsClientset, err := metricsv.NewForConfig(config)
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}

Get the data and store it in podMetricsList array.

namespace := "example"  // leave empty to get data from all namespaces
podMetricsList, err := metricsClientset.MetricsV1beta1().PodMetricses(namespace).List(context.TODO(), metav1.ListOptions{})
if err != nil {
  panic(err.Error())
}

Iterate over the results found.

for _, v := range podMetricsList.Items {
  fmt.Printf("%s\n", v.GetName())
  fmt.Printf("%s\n", v.GetNamespace())
  fmt.Printf("%vm\n", v.Containers[0].Usage.Cpu().MilliValue())
  fmt.Printf("%vMi\n", v.Containers[0].Usage.Memory().Value()/(1024*1024))
}

Note: if you’re inspecting pods that may have more than one container, you’ll need to iterate over v.Containers as well.

Section break
July 16, 2020

#Bootstrap a Go Cobra application with Go Modules

To bootstrap a Go application using Cobra Generator and Go Modules, start by installing the Cobra command line:

# Install Cobra
go get github.com/spf13/cobra/cobra

Initialize your Cobra project, but remember to use your package’s fully qualified name, as in: github.com/laurybueno/kubectl-hoggers. Don’t worry if your package is not publicly available yet. And there is no need to put your source code inside GOPATH anymore (since Go 1.11 at least):

cobra init --pkg-name <fully_qualified_package_name>

Initialize your new module:

go mod init <fully_qualified_package_name>

Get recursively all its dependencies and install it:

go get -d -v ./...
go install -v ./...

Your app’s command line is now ready to be used:

kubectl-hoggers

Further reading

Docker and Go: https://www.docker.com/blog/docker-golang/

Go Modules: https://github.com/golang/go/wiki/Modules